Posted in Activities, Questioning, Geometry, Google Slides, Thinking Questions

Thinking Questions

This idea came from Alice Keeler and the late Diana Herrington’s book Teaching Math with Google Apps. I have wanted to implement it for some time and even had some conversations with Alice about how she is currently using it. This year I finally created some. The whole point behind this type of question is to get student to look up information, explain their thinking, and persevere until they have it correct.

Now, Alice does a much more in depth version of this, and I LOVE it, but my students aren’t ready for it yet. We will get there!

I give the students a question on a slide. One portion is for their answer, another portion is for them to explain their thinking. I leave comments and return them if they need correction or more in depth explanation. Taking some advice from Alice, I started off by giving students credit as quickly as possible. They will get frustrated and quit if they have to resubmit too many times. If the response if VERY incorrect, I will conference with the student face -to -face so we can discuss their misconceptions and they can be more successful with their next submission. I only give one of these a week and I do give them a grade for it. But remember, they can resubmit based on feedback as many times as needed.

Here are some examples of thinking questions I’ve given Geometry so far.

I don’t assign points for practice but I’m making the exception for this. I feel like the effort and perseverance creates a deeper mathematical understanding. The students have responded well to it and most students turn it in successfully.

As always, let me know if you use this idea in your classroom.

 

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Posted in Activities, Geometry, Stop Motion, Triangle Congruence

Stop Motion Triangle Congruence

Triangle congruence is coming up soon. I’ve always done some kind of activity where students construct triangles and discover which ones are congruent.  One activity is Road Kill Cafe shared with me by @craigklement. I’m not sure where it originally came from, sorry. Below is another construction activity we have done very similar to Road Kill Cafe.

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Some of my students get so bogged down in the construction of the triangles, they miss the whole point of the activity. So this year, I wanted a visual to show them. I started my search in Google and stumbled upon this gem. I do plan to use it, but AFTER we have discovered which theorems produce congruent triangles. What I didn’t find was a good set of videos to demonstrate the construction of these triangles. So… I decided to make them. Using Google Slides, I created some stop motion “videos” to demonstrate these constructions. Click over to my other blog, Infinitely Teaching, to check out a tutorial on how to make them.

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Hopefully students can see the relationship with these and not get caught up in the construction process.

 

Posted in Activities, Algebra 1, Choose Your Own Adventure, Circles, Geometry, Solving Equations

Choose Your Own Adventure *Updated*

A lesson is only as good as the updates you make. This activity, which I first blogged about here and here, came from Ditch That Textbook by Matt Miller. I love this idea and now use it as an alternative assessment activity. Please go back and read how this started for me.

One reason I love this activity so much is because it gives students choice and freedom of topic, they become the teacher so they learn the content more deeply, they peer edit which is a very crucial skill, and this year I added a Flipgrid component in collaboration with another school.

I have updated my planning documents a little. They are posted on the posts, but this will be the most up-to-date document I have. I have also created a Google Slide presentation so very little teacher direction is needed. Another update I made this year was to increase the level of peer editing. Students do not intuitively know how to do this, so I updated the document so they have a little more guidance. Lastly, and probably the most exciting part for me, was creating these CYOA stories for a sister class in another district. We sent them our completed stories and then each student left feedback via Flipgrid. We’ve sent our stories to this district before but having video Feedback through Flipgrid was amazing and meant a lot more for my students.

I’ve included some fun examples from this year. I encouraged my Geometry students to create circular images as part of the story.  You can check the links above for examples from previous years including some Algebra 1 examples.

Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 7.26.53 PM           Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 7.29.53 PMScreen Shot 2018-06-22 at 7.32.39 PM

Including the Flipgrid responses from our sister school was an amazing addition. My students loved seeing the faces and hearing their reviewers. It also made the audience “authentic” to them. We did get permission from their parents for my students to view them but we did not include releasing it publically so I can’t share the link to the grid. I’ve included a screenshot of the grid below.

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You can find a link to my resources below.

Planning Guide – 2018 CYOA Scoring Guide-Algebra

2018 Choose Your Own Adventure Planning Guide-Geometry

Slide Presentation – CYOA Planning Guide.png

Student Peer Review Document – 2018 CYOA Scoring Guide-Algebra

2018 CYOA Scoring Guide-Geometry

Here is an example of a peer review. In my experience, you need to model this for your students. I have, in the past, peer-edited my own story with the class so they see what to look for.

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Please give credit to Matt Miller and me if you use this idea. It has been a fabulous learning experience in my classroom and I look forward to the next update!

 

Posted in Activities, Constructions, Geometry, Math Art

Geometric Jack

I created this project my first year of teaching (we won’t talk about how long ago that was). It used to be a teacher-guided activity, but with the use of technology, it’s now a perseverance activity that meets the Geometry construction standards for constructing an equilateral triangle and regular hexagon. We also have a discussion about the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle when they ask the question, “Why doesn’t this fit exactly?”

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I’ve included a link to the doc with animated gifs to guide the students through construction. Seriously, try to not help them. They can figure this out.

Here’s a small gallery of current and past pumpkins. It really is a fun activity that meets our standards. Our goal is to Make Math Not Suck!

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Posted in Activities, Geometry, no tech, Vocabulary

Vocabulary Pictures

Last year I posted a vocabulary activity I’ve done many times with Geometry and our circle unit. Our students love this project so much we decided to use it for other units as well. Our first unit in Geometry is basic vocabulary and notation. My colleague, Tessah Wood, wrote the activity and, once again, our students LOVED it.

Here are some student examples:

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We didn’t have our Chromebooks yet so I created an information page instead of putting in a Slide Deck like I would normally. I’ve included the PDF version of the instruction sheet and the scoring guide and you make recreate it if you want to make changes.

Unit 1 Picture Vocab Project    and       Unit 1 Picture Project

This was a great way to practice their vocabulary and their notations and allow students some choice and creativity. I gave students feedback on their project when they turned it in and allowed them to fix any mistakes they had and resubmit them. It was a great first lesson and discussion about learning from our mistakes to improve.

Let me know if you use this lesson. I love to see examples shared on Twitter so please tag me @TTmomTT if you share.

Posted in Activities, Geometry, no tech, Vocabulary

Circle Vocabulary

I don’t give vocabulary assignments very often. I usually teach it as we go in context of the lesson. Every now and then front-loading vocabulary will make lessons flow more smoothly. That’s the case with our circle unit. I can’t take credit for creating this project, but I really do like it. Students have to look up the words then create a picture with circles and label each one. Once I begin the lessons on this they are already familiar with the vocab. One student asked me during the activity if we could do this more often, “Anytime you can color in math, it’s a good day.” We actually color in Geometry often, so I guess he has a lot of good days 🙂 I’ve included a few examples below and then attached the Slides I gave them with more examples. Use it freely and let me know if you do.  I love it when others can benefit from something I already do.

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Link to Slides for the activity prompt, vocab list and other examples.

Posted in Activities, Bitmoji, Geometry, Google Slides, Transformations

Transformation Comics

This is a lesson that I originally found here. It has gone through many iterations. You can see the progression of these on my sister blog Infinitely Teaching if you want a paper version of this project. I love this project because students have to take the transformation words and work them into their comic. They also use the transformation tools inside drawing or slides to actually transform their superhero.  This year we created Bitmojis and used those in combination with the Jachimo template from SlidesCarnival or template from the ever wonderful Sylvia Duckworth and my students loved it more than they ever have before. It’s amazing what adding a personalized Bitmoji will do for student engagement.

Here is the example I gave my students. We also had a quick exploratory lesson about how to transform the Bitmojis through the arrange menu (or 2 finger click or key command) and a quick lesson on how to crop and mask images.

Superhero Transformations.png

I was even more impressed after my students submitted their projects.

Example 1     Example 2    Example 3

I’ve included the template I gave my students but they weren’t limited to these templates. They had the freedom to create their comics however they saw fit. Remember, giving students choices will make them own their learning more.

Template to create your own (make a copy to edit it)

Please, if you use any of the provided templates, credit the correct person. SlidesCarnival is a wonderful resource and Sylvia has taken a lot of time to put her slide deck together as well.

As always, drop me a note if you use this project. I love to hear from teachers who find these projects useful.