Posted in Activities, BreakIN, Circles, Equations of Lines, games, Geometry, Google Slides

Break-In Game

Matt Miller had a guest post on his blog a while back by John Meehan on a game concept called QR BreakIN. I love to create BreakOUT games so this idea had me intrigued. John’s graphics were amazing and the game boards looked fun. I pondered how to use it in my math classroom for quite a while until an idea finally surfaced.

A few areas had me stumped.  1. I needed the tasks to be sequential and most games boards where you roll dice are random. 2. I didn’t think, unless it was a review day, I could accomplish much in our 45 minute class period using his format.

I used John’s template but with my own twists. I came up with the Donkey Kong idea because jumping the barrels creates the progression of tasks that I needed. I also made this a unit long game instead of one day. Reading more information on John’s blog, I found a post he had about Power-Ups, so I incorporated that into this game too.

Link to Slide Deck  (All graphics were created in Google Drawing)

7th Donkey Kong Equations (3)          7th Donkey Kong Equations (4)

IMG_2886.JPG

Since the game would be completed over 2 weeks, I made my game board and game pieces electronic. I also wanted to use Google Classroom to release the tasks instead of using QR codes, mainly because our student laptops aren’t the best and they don’t play nice with QR readers.

Donkey Kong Equations (3).png  Screen Shot 2019-04-04 at 9.27.11 AM

Here are my takeaways from this unit long game.

Game Board

I like that I can open the slide from day to day and update the progress of the game instead of moving it from the board and putting it back for each class daily (I did this in 3 classes). However, I felt like it took me longer than I wanted to get the board updated because I was checking and releasing tasks.

Narrator Cards

GENIUS! I gave my students 3 for the unit. The cards could be used to ask a content question of the Narrator. You know what happened? They asked each other instead, just as I had hoped. We are nearing the end of the unit and NO ONE has used a card. They have worked together as a team to find solutions.

Google Classroom instead of QR codes

This one was tricky for me because of the time issue. I did load each post ahead of time as a draft and then I could release to each group as they were ready. This still took more time than I wanted to spend. It would be much simpler to have the QR codes, but I also like that the tasks are still in Google Classroom if they want to reference them.

Student motivation

Wow, kids are serious about earning Power-Ups. If a student did not complete their practice, the team was ALL OVER THEM.  I had more practice completed this unit than ever before.  Students were also, mostly, positive in their encouragement of their team.

Would I do this again? YES. This has been a fun way to present a short and mostly review unit for my students. They seem to be enjoying it.

Check out the hashtag #QRBreakIN on Twitter and also lurk around John’s blog. He does some amazing things with students.

 

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Posted in Activities, Algebra 1, Choose Your Own Adventure, Circles, Geometry, Solving Equations

Choose Your Own Adventure *Updated*

A lesson is only as good as the updates you make. This activity, which I first blogged about here and here, came from Ditch That Textbook by Matt Miller. I love this idea and now use it as an alternative assessment activity. Please go back and read how this started for me.

One reason I love this activity so much is because it gives students choice and freedom of topic, they become the teacher so they learn the content more deeply, they peer edit which is a very crucial skill, and this year I added a Flipgrid component in collaboration with another school.

I have updated my planning documents a little. They are posted on the posts, but this will be the most up-to-date document I have. I have also created a Google Slide presentation so very little teacher direction is needed. Another update I made this year was to increase the level of peer editing. Students do not intuitively know how to do this, so I updated the document so they have a little more guidance. Lastly, and probably the most exciting part for me, was creating these CYOA stories for a sister class in another district. We sent them our completed stories and then each student left feedback via Flipgrid. We’ve sent our stories to this district before but having video Feedback through Flipgrid was amazing and meant a lot more for my students.

I’ve included some fun examples from this year. I encouraged my Geometry students to create circular images as part of the story.  You can check the links above for examples from previous years including some Algebra 1 examples.

Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 7.26.53 PM           Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 7.29.53 PMScreen Shot 2018-06-22 at 7.32.39 PM

Including the Flipgrid responses from our sister school was an amazing addition. My students loved seeing the faces and hearing their reviewers. It also made the audience “authentic” to them. We did get permission from their parents for my students to view them but we did not include releasing it publically so I can’t share the link to the grid. I’ve included a screenshot of the grid below.

Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 8.10.36 PMScreen Shot 2018-06-22 at 8.10.08 PM

You can find a link to my resources below.

Planning Guide – 2018 CYOA Scoring Guide-Algebra

2018 Choose Your Own Adventure Planning Guide-Geometry

Slide Presentation – CYOA Planning Guide.png

Student Peer Review Document – 2018 CYOA Scoring Guide-Algebra

2018 CYOA Scoring Guide-Geometry

Here is an example of a peer review. In my experience, you need to model this for your students. I have, in the past, peer-edited my own story with the class so they see what to look for.

Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 8.20.25 PM

Please give credit to Matt Miller and me if you use this idea. It has been a fabulous learning experience in my classroom and I look forward to the next update!

 

Posted in Activities, Circles, Geometry, Solving Equations

Choose Your Own Adventure

This has become one of my favorite projects to do. I stole the idea from Matt Miller in his book Ditch That Textbook. As Alice Keeler often says, you shouldn’t have 30 of the exact same thing and with this project, you have 30 unique stories. I’ve done this with Algebra when we review solving equations and in Geometry as an assessment for Segments and Angles in Circles. I love that students have to know common misconceptions to create realistic wrong answers. Great conversations happen when you challenge their wrong answers and why they chose them. I love that they have to peer edit, revise, then peer edit again. I also love that in Geometry we learn how to use Google Drawing. I try to throw Google Apps lessons in whenever I can. We also have a great conversation about Creative Commons licensing and how I can’t publish their adventure to the world if they have used copyrighted material. This year I created a hyperdoc so students would have all of their instructions in one place. I also gave them the scoring guide so they could work through their partners problems and also check for navigation issues.

Here are a couple of exemplary examples from my students.

I love the Wizard’s School because she actually made the circles part of the story. Very well done.

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.49.41 PM

The second example, Journey to be a Mage, is from Algebra 1. This student wanted to make sure I could share his story so he drew all of his images on notepad on his iPhone. Amazing!

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.48.47 PM

The last two are just good examples (they may have an error here and there) of stories and images. The one with the dog was my student taking images of her dog. She was so excited.

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.48.02 PMScreen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.46.44 PM

I have included a link to the hyperdoc. It is view only but you can make a copy and edit as you wish.

This is a link to the PDF version of the scoring guide I give students to peer edit with.

Please leave enough time to conference with your students through the journey and give them time to peer edit and correct. We want them to do it right so it can be shared with the world.