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Posted in Activities, Constructions, Geometry, Math Art

Geometric Jack

I created this project my first year of teaching (we won’t talk about how long ago that was). It used to be a teacher-guided activity, but with the use of technology, it’s now a perseverance activity that meets the Geometry construction standards for constructing an equilateral triangle and regular hexagon. We also have a discussion about the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle when they ask the question, “Why doesn’t this fit exactly?”

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I’ve included a link to the doc with animated gifs to guide the students through construction. Seriously, try to not help them. They can figure this out.

Here’s a small gallery of current and past pumpkins. It really is a fun activity that meets our standards. Our goal is to Make Math Not Suck!

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Posted in Activities, games, Google Slides, Parallel Lines

Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game with Google Slides

I try to incorporate an activity into every lesson. My goal is to make math not suck and sitting and taking notes is not the way to do it. A colleague found this memory game in an investigation for parallel and perpendicular lines from Wapakonta High School (sorry, I don’t know who to credit.) I love this type of activity but I HATE cutting out paper and having to keep track of the paper from year to year. I played around with Google Slides until I came up with a workable electronic memory game.

I included the instructions in the memory game, delete two cards and if they are a match, keep them deleted. If they don’t match, control z twice and put them back. I made the graphs a background image so they wouldn’t be deleted by accident.

Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game (2)

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Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game

It was fun and it was great practice for identifying parallel and perpendicular from a slope. A few areas of improvement from the students, make the graphs bigger and make the cards images because they kept clicking on the ? and deleting it instead.

Here’s a link to the slide. If you are interested in creating your own, click over to Infinitely Teaching for the tutorial.

Posted in Algebra 1, Functions, Questioning

Math Talk – Functions

I am always trying to include student discourse and critical thinking in my lessons. This activity started as a sort that we would do AFTER the lesson was completed. This year I decided to change it up and created this slide deck as a lesson opener. The students were told which ones were functions and which ones were not and they had to talk at their tables and determine WHY they were functions. I asked the “What do you notice?” and “What patterns do you see?” type questions.

Function not Function

Both Algebra 1 classes came up with a pattern they noticed and they were able to narrow their pattern down to the x-axis, which is awesome. I continued with this discussion using tables, then function maps and asked if their pattern worked for those as well.  When we started the formal note section, they were already comfortable with their idea of a function and I could use their words to tie into math vocabulary. I love when they create their own ideas and knowledge from questions instead of simply writing down what I give in notes. It means so much more to them.

I followed this activity by giving each student a relation and they had to defend on Flipgrid if it was a function and why. I love to have students explain on Flipgrid!

I’ve included a link to the slide deck I used for this activity if this is something you would also like to use.

Posted in Activities, literal equations, no tech, solve for y

Solve for y

I have a fun activity I created with @AliceKeeler using a Google Expedition and spreadsheet activity to reinforce WHY we need to solve for y or another variable in literal equations. [I will link here when I post this activity, didn’t realize I hadn’t posted this activity!]  For some students, this is enough, but for others, they need more time with the actual process of HOW to solve for y (or another variable). One of my colleagues found this idea on I Speak Math. Now if you don’t follow Julie on Twitter or her blog then you are missing out. Pause reading and go follow her right now, you won’t be sorry.

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My cups were quite large so this group made their own balance scale!

I switched it up a little and used Starburst instead of Kisses. I also had counters that were red on one side and green on the other. I loved that as students balanced their equation, they physically flipped the counters over to show the sign change.

I used her activity sheet (see her post),  but then continued to practice by putting equations on the board because my students wanted to practice more.  We also ended putting an example in our notes at the request of the class. We also added examples with negative y but flipping the cups upside down. We have to switch the sign (change colors of Starburst or flip the counters over) to put the cups upright. You can’t put candy in an upside-down cup.

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Example we wrote in our notes

Here’s what I love about this activity. 1. Students were physically balancing these equations and could see why terms change signs. 2. When students tried to combine a variable and a constant I could remind them that you can’t add counters and Starburst together. 3. They now understand why you divide EVERY term by y’s coefficient; you have to know how many will go into each cup. I have referenced this activity many times while continuing to work with students. Thanks Julie for the awesome idea!

Posted in Activities, Geometry, no tech, Vocabulary

Vocabulary Pictures

Last year I posted a vocabulary activity I’ve done many times with Geometry and our circle unit. Our students love this project so much we decided to use it for other units as well. Our first unit in Geometry is basic vocabulary and notation. My colleague, Tessah Wood, wrote the activity and, once again, our students LOVED it.

Here are some student examples:

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We didn’t have our Chromebooks yet so I created an information page instead of putting in a Slide Deck like I would normally. I’ve included the PDF version of the instruction sheet and the scoring guide and you make recreate it if you want to make changes.

Unit 1 Picture Vocab Project    and       Unit 1 Picture Project

This was a great way to practice their vocabulary and their notations and allow students some choice and creativity. I gave students feedback on their project when they turned it in and allowed them to fix any mistakes they had and resubmit them. It was a great first lesson and discussion about learning from our mistakes to improve.

Let me know if you use this lesson. I love to see examples shared on Twitter so please tag me @TTmomTT if you share.

Posted in Activities, BreakoutEDU, Solving Equations

Solar Eclipse Breakout

The Total Solar Eclipse happens at the beginning of our school year. Since we will still be in the introduction/relationship building phase and won’t have learned new content, I wanted to create a BreakoutEDU that included prior knowledge. I searched online to see if any already existed and stumbled upon a digital one created by Wendy Lentz. I loved it, but my students won’t have their Chromebooks yet, so I needed one that wasn’t 100% reliant on technology. I also wanted to incorporate math. I did borrow her video and Google Form (with her permission) and included it in my Breakout. Definitely check out Wendy’s! She did an amazing job.

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Downloads from NASA https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/downloadables

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I plan to do this with my Freshman. You can adapt it for any age you like. I’ve linked to the folder with all of my resources. You will need to make a copy to edit. The form will not be editable for you but you can email me if you would like the ability to edit.

My breakout needs a small, medium, and large box. It uses the following locks: 3-digit, two 4-digit, 4- letter, 5-letter, directional, & a keyed padlock.

You will also need a Chromebook or iPad and black light with marker. I have included instructions to make red-letter code glasses and you will need red cellophane and cardstock to make those.

Please let me know if you use it and/or tag me in your photos on Twitter (@TTmomTT). I love to see students using resources I’ve shared.

Posted in Activities, Geometry, no tech, Vocabulary

Circle Vocabulary

I don’t give vocabulary assignments very often. I usually teach it as we go in context of the lesson. Every now and then front-loading vocabulary will make lessons flow more smoothly. That’s the case with our circle unit. I can’t take credit for creating this project, but I really do like it. Students have to look up the words then create a picture with circles and label each one. Once I begin the lessons on this they are already familiar with the vocab. One student asked me during the activity if we could do this more often, “Anytime you can color in math, it’s a good day.” We actually color in Geometry often, so I guess he has a lot of good days 🙂 I’ve included a few examples below and then attached the Slides I gave them with more examples. Use it freely and let me know if you do.  I love it when others can benefit from something I already do.

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Link to Slides for the activity prompt, vocab list and other examples.