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Posted in Activities, BreakoutEDU, Solving Equations

Solar Eclipse Breakout

The Total Solar Eclipse happens at the beginning of our school year. Since we will still be in the introduction/relationship building phase and won’t have learned new content, I wanted to create a BreakoutEDU that included prior knowledge. I searched online to see if any already existed and stumbled upon a digital one created by Wendy Lentz. I loved it, but my students won’t have their Chromebooks yet, so I needed one that wasn’t 100% reliant on technology. I also wanted to incorporate math. I did borrow her video and Google Form (with her permission) and included it in my Breakout. Definitely check out Wendy’s! She did an amazing job.

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Downloads from NASA https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/downloadables

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I plan to do this with my Freshman. You can adapt it for any age you like. I’ve linked to the folder with all of my resources. You will need to make a copy to edit. The form will not be editable for you but you can email me if you would like the ability to edit.

My breakout needs a small, medium, and large box. It uses the following locks: 3-digit, two 4-digit, 4- letter, 5-letter, directional, & a keyed padlock.

You will also need a Chromebook or iPad and black light with marker. I have included instructions to make red-letter code glasses and you will need red cellophane and cardstock to make those.

Please let me know if you use it and/or tag me in your photos on Twitter (@TTmomTT). I love to see students using resources I’ve shared.

Posted in Activities, Geometry, no tech, Vocabulary

Circle Vocabulary

I don’t give vocabulary assignments very often. I usually teach it as we go in context of the lesson. Every now and then front-loading vocabulary will make lessons flow more smoothly. That’s the case with our circle unit. I can’t take credit for creating this project, but I really do like it. Students have to look up the words then create a picture with circles and label each one. Once I begin the lessons on this they are already familiar with the vocab. One student asked me during the activity if we could do this more often, “Anytime you can color in math, it’s a good day.” We actually color in Geometry often, so I guess he has a lot of good days 🙂 I’ve included a few examples below and then attached the Slides I gave them with more examples. Use it freely and let me know if you do.  I love it when others can benefit from something I already do.

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Link to Slides for the activity prompt, vocab list and other examples.

Posted in Inequalities, Questioning

Questions for Inequalities lesson

This is an exploratory lesson for inequalities and absolute value. It involves questioning and students demonstrating their understanding with a visual. I find it difficult to script my question writing because I take cues from my students, but hopefully, this will be a good place to start. You will be tempted to show your students a number line like below. Don’t do this. They will probably use this because they’ve seen it before but don’t limit them. You will be surprised with the visual representations that your students will come up with.

inequalities

This is a 3 lesson series that build upon the last. Inequalities is the first lesson in the series.

x+4<5      What numbers make this statement true? Create a visual representation to show all of the solutions your group finds.

What are some ideas about you have that would help us solve this problem? Try them out and see if you get a solution similar to your visual representation from before.

Discuss successes and failures as a group and what we could learn from them.

-2x > 6      What numbers make this statement true? Create a visual representation to show all of the solutions your group finds.

Solve this one with the same method you used before or another method you hear about when we discussed.  Was this process the same or different? Why do you think it was this way?

-3x+2  ≤  -4      What numbers make this statement true? Can we use the same procedure as before?  Create a visual representation to show all of the solutions your group finds.

Solve this one with the same method you used before or another method you hear about when we discussed.  Was this process the same or different? Why do you think it was this way?

What is a rule that seems to work for all of these? Discuss at your table, everyone has something to add.

Compound Inequalities

-5<x<4       How might this problem be the same and different from the ones before?  What numbers make this statement true? Create a visual representation to show all of the solutions your group finds.

What ideas do you have for solving this? We will share our ideas and discuss.

-9 ≤ 2x + 3 < 5     What numbers make this statement true? Can we use the same procedure as before?  Create a visual representation to show all of the solutions your group finds.

Try to solve this based on our discussion. What are some thoughts you have about this type of problem?

6 > -2x +4 ≥ -12       What numbers make this statement true? Create a visual representation to show all of the solutions your group finds.

Solve this one with the same method you used before or another method you hear about when we discussed.  Was this process the same or different? Why do you think it was this way?

What is a rule that seems to work for all of these? Discuss at your table, everyone has something to add.

5x ≥ 15 or 2x+3 < -13   How would you solve this? Think and discuss with your table and try to find a solution. You can use any method that works.

I would at the end talk about AND and OR symbols and have the students write down what they feel like is important for notes.

The next lesson will explore Absolute Value.

Posted in Activities, comparing functions, games, no tech

Two Truths & a Lie

Who doesn’t love two truths and a lie? I picked up this idea from a fellow teacher. She doesn’t tweet but I want to give a shout out to Ms. Wood for this one. We started doing this during the comparing functions unit but you could do this with any unit. Imagine solving equations where two were solved correctly and one wasn’t. Great way to encourage students to defend their answers.

I do this in groups. The whole group has to agree what the lie is and be able to explain why. The lies are supposed to be based on common misconceptions, not some random wrong answer. The team presenting gets points if no one guesses correctly. Each guessing team writes on a whiteboard to commit to an answer. The team gets a point if the pick the correct lie. They get an additional point if they can accurately explain why it’s a lie.

Anytime you can make learning a game students love it. I love that we are sneaking critical thinking into the game.

Here are some examples of papers created. You decide what the lie is.

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We have created these on individual whiteboards, scrap paper, and large chart paper. Whatever you have will work. I do recommend thicker markers if using paper. If not, the back of the room can’t see.

Please share topics you use two truths and a lie with. We would love to use them too.

Posted in Activities, Bitmoji, Geometry, Google Slides, Transformations

Transformation Comics

This is a lesson that I originally found here. It has gone through many iterations. You can see the progression of these on my sister blog Infinitely Teaching if you want a paper version of this project. I love this project because students have to take the transformation words and work them into their comic. They also use the transformation tools inside drawing or slides to actually transform their superhero.  This year we created Bitmojis and used those in combination with the Jachimo template from SlidesCarnival or template from the ever wonderful Sylvia Duckworth and my students loved it more than they ever have before. It’s amazing what adding a personalized Bitmoji will do for student engagement.

Here is the example I gave my students. We also had a quick exploratory lesson about how to transform the Bitmojis through the arrange menu (or 2 finger click or key command) and a quick lesson on how to crop and mask images.

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I was even more impressed after my students submitted their projects.

Example 1     Example 2    Example 3

I’ve included the template I gave my students but they weren’t limited to these templates. They had the freedom to create their comics however they saw fit. Remember, giving students choices will make them own their learning more.

Template to create your own (make a copy to edit it)

Please, if you use any of the provided templates, credit the correct person. SlidesCarnival is a wonderful resource and Sylvia has taken a lot of time to put her slide deck together as well.

As always, drop me a note if you use this project. I love to hear from teachers who find these projects useful.

Posted in Activities, Circles, Geometry, Solving Equations

Choose Your Own Adventure

This has become one of my favorite projects to do. I stole the idea from Matt Miller in his book Ditch That Textbook. As Alice Keeler often says, you shouldn’t have 30 of the exact same thing and with this project, you have 30 unique stories. I’ve done this with Algebra when we review solving equations and in Geometry as an assessment for Segments and Angles in Circles. I love that students have to know common misconceptions to create realistic wrong answers. Great conversations happen when you challenge their wrong answers and why they chose them. I love that they have to peer edit, revise, then peer edit again. I also love that in Geometry we learn how to use Google Drawing. I try to throw Google Apps lessons in whenever I can. We also have a great conversation about Creative Commons licensing and how I can’t publish their adventure to the world if they have used copyrighted material. This year I created a hyperdoc so students would have all of their instructions in one place. I also gave them the scoring guide so they could work through their partners problems and also check for navigation issues.

Here are a couple of exemplary examples from my students.

I love the Wizard’s School because she actually made the circles part of the story. Very well done.

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The second example, Journey to be a Mage, is from Algebra 1. This student wanted to make sure I could share his story so he drew all of his images on notepad on his iPhone. Amazing!

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The last two are just good examples (they may have an error here and there) of stories and images. The one with the dog was my student taking images of her dog. She was so excited.

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I have included a link to the hyperdoc. It is view only but you can make a copy and edit as you wish.

This is a link to the PDF version of the scoring guide I give students to peer edit with.

Please leave enough time to conference with your students through the journey and give them time to peer edit and correct. We want them to do it right so it can be shared with the world.

Posted in Activities, Geometry, Parallel Lines

Geometric Town Project

This is a culminating project that we do in Geometry. It was originally created by a colleague of mine who has since retired. It has gone through many revisions over the past 6 year. I love that it reviews parallel line angle relationships, equations of lines, properties of quadrilaterals, perimeter & area and equations of circles. Not to mention it allows for some student choice and creativity. I’ve posted the most recent update and some examples of student work. Students create the map of a town using the specified guidelines from the town planner.

Project Link

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This is a wonderful end of the year project to tie in with previous knowledge. I hope you can use this in your classroom.

Cross posted on infinetlyteaching.wordpress.com